Comment Bode Miller est devenu un génie autodidacte

Ce qui suit est extrait de The Fall Line: How American Ski Racers Conquered a Sport on the Edge, par Nathaniel Vinton. Le livre est maintenant disponible sur Amazon.

Le parcours improbable de Bode Miller vers l'équipe de ski américaine a commencé à Cannon Mountain, un domaine skiable à l'ancienne à Franconia Notch. Bien que son premier ski ait eu lieu sur le terrain en pente derrière le camp de tennis de sa famille, les pistes escarpées de Cannon sont devenues sa deuxième maison en grandissant. Lorsque Bode et ses frères et sœurs étaient petits, leur mère les y déposait souvent pour skier seuls au lieu de la garderie. Jo pensait qu'ils brûleraient de l'énergie, rencontreraient le monde naturel et se feraient des amis ou seraient leur propre entreprise.

Apprendre à prendre une longueur d'avance dans la neige était une question de survie à Cannon, où les sentiers sinueux étaient souvent recouverts de glace. Bode se débrouillait avec du matériel emprunté ou à la main, des skis trop longs pour lui et des bottes si grandes qu'il devait faire très attention à son équilibre pour ne pas basculer en avant ou en arrière, tomber sur la glace et glisser dans les arbres. Souvent, il était obligé d'utiliser tout son corps pour faire un virage, sautant pour se dégonfler et tordant le bas de son corps pour balancer ses skis afin qu'ils pointent dans l'autre direction.

La plupart de ces improvisations n'étaient pas supervisées. Pendant quelques années, Miller a fait partie du Franconia Ski Club, une équipe de course de l'USSA, mais le premier affrontement de sa vie avec des entraîneurs a mis fin à cela, et Miller a appris à skier seul, s'entraînant à travers les négociations complexes. entre son corps et la gravité qui ont formé la base de son style de ski. C'est dans ces années, dira-t-il plus tard, qu'il découvrit son tour.

Naturellement, la découverte s'est produite alors qu'il skiait vite. Une grande partie du temps qu'il a passé à Cannon, Miller était accroupi bas dans la position de repli classique, ses bras tendus et ses skis de merde claquant sur la neige dure, se déplaçant si vite que le vent a tiré des larmes de ses yeux et les a gelés dans les coins. de ses lunettes. Les patrouilleurs de ski de Cannon, ayant été témoins de l'épave humaine de trop de collisions, étaient en alerte pour Bode, prêts à le pourchasser et à confisquer son forfait pour imprudence.

Mais la vitesse n'était pas seulement une question de sensations fortes; Bode a constaté que plus il allait vite, mieux il comprenait la physique du ski, car ces concepts s'annonçaient dans sa chair. Skier vite, comme tous les skieurs l'apprennent, amplifie les forces naturelles à l'œuvre dans le sport. Vos jambes vibrent avec le frottement cinétique de vos skis déplaçant la neige. Vous avez du mal à empêcher vos bras et votre torse de se tordre dans l'air lent et résistant. Toutes ces forces se combinent en permutations infinies à chaque course rapide. Bode a appris très tôt que s'il pouvait suffisamment réprimer sa peur pour les écouter, et ajuster son corps et son chemin pour anticiper leurs effets, il pourrait les utiliser pour faire des choses que la plupart des skieurs n'auraient jamais imaginées.

When Bode was 14, he lost the chief sponsor of his nascent skiing career: his grandmother, who died of brain cancer in 1992. Peg Kenney had supported her grandson's downhill truancy, buying him season passes at Cannon each winter and letting him partly repay her later with money he earned from summer jobs repairing tennis courts. Her death came at a turbulent time in the Miller household. Jo and Woody had split up, and Woody went away for a bit, leaving Jo to raise the kids at Turtle Ridge. She was piecing together various streams of income, helping run the tennis camp in the summer and in the winters sewing buttonholes on nightgowns for a local clothing company. Her annual income didn't exceed $10,000 a year.

In part because Bode was still crazy about skiing, Jo took a receptionist job at Cannon, where one of the employee perks was free season passes for the entire family. Bode continued to ski daily (and snowboard too), bombing around the mountain with an older crowd and catching rides back home at the end of the day. The future world champion might have languished in that milieu if not for the creativity of John and Patty Ritzo, old friends of the Kenney clan. While teaching and coaching skiing at a nearby prep school years earlier, Ritzo had watched Bode skiing at Cannon and saw promise in the boy's self-taught technique. Five years later, he was the headmaster of Carrabassett Valley Academy in Maine; remembering Bode's funky turns and knowing that resources were dear at Turtle Ridge, Ritzo called Jo and told her he was in a position to offer Bode a scholarship.

CVA was a ski academy. Students carried full course loads in the fall and spring so that their winter schedules could accommodate training and racing. Located near the town of Kingfield, at the base of Sugarloaf Mountain, CVA was a top feeder program for the US Ski Team. It was expensive, but Ritzo suggested a living arrangement that would save Bode from boarding fees as well as adjustment issues; he could live 20 miles from the campus with Sam Anderson, another scholarship student, who lived with his mother in a woodstove-heated log cabin accessible in the winter only by snowmobile.

In his freshman year at CVA, Bode was exposed for the first time to the kind of sophisticated instruction that most top ski racers had encountered at a much younger age. For the first time, he was training alongside a group of older peers whose varied abilities placed them on every step of the US skiing development pyramid. Some had sponsorships from ski companies. Others had raced in the national championships. They wore coats and fleeces embroidered with the names of USSA's elite regional teams. They had raced around the country, sometimes in Europe, always under the close supervision of coaches who alerted them to bad habits of body position and timing.

At CVA, skiing was a regimented endeavor. Every day during winter, a fleet of vans and buses shuttled students up to nearby Sugarloaf, where roped-off trails were reserved for their training courses. A group of older boys preparing for speed races in Montana might train downhill from 7–9 a.m., then return to the school as a group of girls set out for slalom training in advance of a weekend series in Vermont. In the evening, groups would reconvene to analyze video, with coaches slowing down the tape of each run to a frame-by-frame crawl.

With his secondhand equipment and self-generated carving technique, Bode stood out for the wrong reasons. The freeze-frame images of him were among the most ungainly. With his arms swinging wildly and his weight rocking back on his heels, he was the antithesis of Alberto Tomba, whose disciplined, forward-driving style his classmates sought to mimic. What Bode had going for him, coaches and classmates would later recall, was an ironclad confidence derived in part from his natural athleticism. Bode excelled on the soccer field and tennis courts, could dunk a basketball, was adept on a skateboard, and could throw a football on a level plane with either hand. He was hardwired for sports, and few things illustrated it more clearly than his instant mastery of one of the school's autumn conditioning rituals: upstream runs through the riverbed of the mostly dry Carrabassett River.

The river runs were perfect training for ski racing. The idea was to jog over the boulders and cobbles while keeping your sneakers dry and your shins unbloodied. After running along for a mile in this way, leaping with downcast eyes, you entered a sort of trance. As your field of vision narrowed to the rocks scrolling by, your ankles learned to instantly gauge the wobbliness of each weathered stone, feeling out its angularity or slickness. It was not unlike skiing, in which the muscles and joints in your legs provide not just stability but intelligence, a constant stream of information for the brain to compute. Going fast activated something powerful in one's deepest cognitive faculties. It was an instinct that Bode had honed in lieu of instruction from others.

From the beginning of his time at CVA, Bode owned the river runs. No one could compete. A coach would drive the kids down Route 27 and drop them off; they would all scamper down into the riverbed; the run would start; and Bode would jump out into the lead. In a minute or two he would disappear around a bend, way out in front of everyone, reaping the harvest of truant days playing in the streambed back home at Turtle Ridge.

Elite teenage sports academies can induce peculiar neuroses, in part because ambitious children tend to fixate on the measurements of achievement, the imperfect systems of ranking and scores, and interpret those measurements as ends in themselves. At CVA, Bode Miller never fell victim to that mentality, and in fact went toward the other extreme, paying little attention to concrete results. He devoted his energy to experimenting with equipment and taking tuck runs down Sugarloaf when the ski patrol wasn't looking. He played around on classmates' snowboards. He developed his own notions of technique and line, and argued on behalf of them with his coaches.

Bode was far from the best skier at the school, but he was the most analytical. As they rode the chairlift together during training, his roommate Sam Anderson recalls, Bode would study the tracks in the snow and theorize about them. Bode would ski lines that he couldn't physically pull off yet, rather than ski where everyone else did. After a race, Bode would break down his run, talking about all the things he'd done wrong. His analysis was often an entirely different interpretation of his mistakes from what his coaches would point out. What Anderson remembers most was Bode's granite self-confidence, his ability to tune out critics. "It was incredible how he never let that bother him," Anderson recalls. "He had this unwavering certainty about what he was going to do."

Bode improved while at CVA, and by his junior year he even won some important races, but he retained his tendency to lean back, and even denied that it was a bad habit. Every day, coaches advised him to move his weight forward, insisting that was the only way to maintain stability and initiate a turn—the crucial moment when a ski begins bending. Miller countered that leaning back was an effective way to carve; by moving his weight back onto his heels, he could put bend in the tails of the skis.

Luckily for Miller, one of his primary coaches at CVA was Chip Cochrane, a former World Cup downhiller from northern Maine who saw Miller's potential and allowed him the leeway to invent his own style. Witnesses to their relationship remember them arguing stub- bornly but respectfully on van rides. Cochrane could see that Bode had grown up in a more intimate relationship with the mountains than the average skier, and had received minimal formal education in skiing technique.

"Chip is probably maybe the second most independent person I've met in my life, Bode being the first," John Ritzo recalls. "A lot of coaches prior to that tried to fit Bode into the more traditional model. Chip didn't. I think he saw the potential Bode had, but I think he also saw that Bode had his own ideas."

By Bode's senior year at CVA, he was convinced that skis shaped more like snowboards would help his skiing as much as any of the reconfigurations of stance his coaches were recommending. He needed more sidecut. The term essentially means that the ski has an hourglass shape; instead of a long rectangle, uniform in width from end to end, a ski with sidecut is wide near each end but narrow in the middle, where the skier stands on it. Skis had been built with sidecut for decades, but usually only with a minimal amount, especially race skis, where sidecut was thought to be a destabilizing factor.

Snowboards were another story. CVA had a snowboarding team, and Miller—who was a skilled boarder himself—couldn't help seeing how snowboarders seemed to spring from one turn to the next. It was easier for them to get their boards to bend and track through a turn than it was for most of the skiers to do the same. Something was helping them handle the centrifugal forces that built up at the apex of the turn.

It was clearly the equipment, Miller thought—particularly the standard snowboard's hourglass shape. If you clicked into a snowboard, sat down on the snow and extended your legs down the slope so the snowboard rested upright on its edge, you could see how the board was narrowest in its midsection. The edges along each end of the board would be in contact with the slope but, because of the sidecut, a crescent of daylight would be visible in the middle where your feet were attached. As you pushed your feet down on the middle of the board, you depressed the middle of it until the whole edge was touching the snow, and the board was bent in an arc perfect for carving.

Miller searched around for skis with radical sidecuts, but few existed. The only ones on hand were K2 Fours, a recreational model designed for intermediate skiers as an instructional crutch. The skis were short and lightweight, the exact opposite of racing skis, and when Miller took them up on the mountain, the K2 Fours did exactly what he expected. As his speed mounted and he tilted the skis up on edge, their tips and tails gripped the snow, and the skis bent and took off.

Miller soon mounted each ski with an EPB plate, a foot-long strip of layered rubber and metal under the foot, between the ski and the binding. It was meant to dampen vibration, and also to make the ski heavier. When Miller tried that combination, he knew it would work. He decided to race with the whole kooky assembly at the Junior Olympics, a season-end championship that featured the best hundred juniors in the eastern United States in four races: downhill, super G, giant slalom, and slalom.

Miller won three of the four races and was second in the fourth. He used the K2 Fours in the super G and won by 2.02 seconds. He used them in the giant slalom and won by 2.11 seconds. The victories guaranteed his invitation to the US national championships, to be held a few weeks later on the same slope at Sugarloaf. Starting thirtieth in the slalom there, Miller wore his torn-up old speedsuit and a pair of K2 slalom skis with tip deflectors. He finished third. According to the objective selection criteria, that meant he was on the US Ski Team.

Two months later Miller failed to graduate from CVA, spurning a senior English assignment while he pursued his skiing dreams.

Excerpted with permission from The Fall Line: How American Ski Racers Conquered a Sport on the Edge , by Nathaniel Vinton. Copyright 2015, W. W. Norton & Company.

Nathaniel Vinton is an investigative sports reporter at the New York Daily News and longtime ski racing correspondent. Find ways to find him online at www.nathanielvinton.com

Suggested posts

HEAR ME OUT: Les Yankees devraient chercher à négocier avec Aaron Judge

HEAR ME OUT: Les Yankees devraient chercher à négocier avec Aaron Judge

Il suffit de penser au transport qu'il apporterait. Alors que la saison de la MLB avance, le Hot Stove se réchauffe.

X marque le mécontentement

X marque le mécontentement

Xavien Howard Il ne fait aucun doute que Xavien Howard est l'un des meilleurs demi de coin de la NFL. Il a eu 10 – DIX – interceptions la saison dernière.

Related posts

Choc des chocs, l'histoire que l'UEFA a vendue n'était pas le cas

Choc des chocs, l'histoire que l'UEFA a vendue n'était pas le cas

Le milieu de terrain danois Christian Eriksen s'est effondré sur le terrain dans un moment effrayant samedi. Le jeu a continué, mais il s'est avéré qu'il s'est poursuivi sous des prétextes assez louches.

L'hôpital où Anthony Rizzo rend visite à des enfants malades qualifie le vaccin COVID de «choix personnel»

L'hôpital où Anthony Rizzo rend visite à des enfants malades qualifie le vaccin COVID de «choix personnel»

Anthony Rizzo Si vous n'êtes pas dans ou autour de la région de Chicago, vous ne connaissez peut-être pas l'hôpital pour enfants Ann and Robert H. Lurie.

VOIR: un fan de Phoenix frappe un homme en maillot des Nuggets et déclare "Suns in four"

VOIR: un fan de Phoenix frappe un homme en maillot des Nuggets et déclare "Suns in four"

Les Denver Nuggets ne peuvent pas sortir comme ça. Non seulement les Nuggets ont perdu 3-0 contre les Suns en demi-finale de la Conférence Ouest, mais apparemment leurs fans sont également battus.

Personne ne veut que Novak Djokovic soit le meilleur joueur de tous les temps, mais il pourrait l'être

Personne ne veut que Novak Djokovic soit le meilleur joueur de tous les temps, mais il pourrait l'être

Il est vraiment bon, mais pouah. Lorsqu'on discute de l'histoire du tennis, les goûts des gens influenceront toujours les débats boueux sur qui est quoi et les places qu'ils occupent.

MORE COOL STUFF

Pourquoi Al Pacino a réécrit la scène culminante de la salle d'audience dans "Et justice pour tous"

Pourquoi Al Pacino a réécrit la scène culminante de la salle d'audience dans "Et justice pour tous"

Al Pacino a surpris Norman Jewison en disant qu'il avait réécrit le point culminant de "Et la justice pour tous". Mais Pacino avait ses raisons.

"RHOC" Cast Shakeup: Kelly Dodd Out, Heather Dubrow revient pour la saison 16

"RHOC" Cast Shakeup: Kelly Dodd Out, Heather Dubrow revient pour la saison 16

Kelly Dodd a été supprimée de la saison 16 de « RHOC » et ne reviendra pas car Heather Dubrow revient pour son orange.

Kevin Hart sonne sur Cancel Culture - "La dernière fois que j'ai vérifié, la seule façon de grandir est de foutre"

Kevin Hart sonne sur Cancel Culture - "La dernière fois que j'ai vérifié, la seule façon de grandir est de foutre"

Kevin Hart s'est récemment prononcé contre l'annulation de la culture, notant que les personnalités publiques sont les seules censées être parfaites.

Quand les écrivains « Sopranos » se sont tournés vers « North by Northwest » d'Hitchcock pour s'inspirer

Quand les écrivains « Sopranos » se sont tournés vers « North by Northwest » d'Hitchcock pour s'inspirer

À la fin des «Sopranos», les écrivains ont opté pour un effet Alfred Hitchcock lors de la création d'une identité alternative pour Tony Soprano.

Qui était le mystérieux Melchisédek dans la Bible ?

Qui était le mystérieux Melchisédek dans la Bible ?

Il ne fait qu'une brève apparition dans la Genèse, mais il a été considéré comme un précurseur de Jésus-Christ. Qu'était-il vraiment et comment s'est-il associé à Jésus ?

Fannie Lou Hamer : de métayer à icône des droits civiques et de vote

Fannie Lou Hamer : de métayer à icône des droits civiques et de vote

Née dans une famille de métayers pauvres du Mississippi, Fannie Lou Hamer est devenue secrétaire de terrain du Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) et une infatigable combattante pour les droits civiques et de vote.

Une tempête parfaite de catastrophes mondiales provoque la pénurie mondiale de semi-conducteurs

Une tempête parfaite de catastrophes mondiales provoque la pénurie mondiale de semi-conducteurs

La civilisation moderne dépend de plus en plus des semi-conducteurs, mais la chaîne d'approvisionnement a été perturbée par la pandémie de COVID-19, les sécheresses et d'autres problèmes au moment même où la demande augmente.

À 8'11", Robert Wadlow était l'homme le plus grand du monde

À 8'11", Robert Wadlow était l'homme le plus grand du monde

Et il grandissait encore au moment de sa mort. Mais Robert Wadlow était bien plus que sa taille extraordinaire.

Un homme du Texas arrêté après avoir prétendument traîné l'ex de sa mère derrière un camion et mis le feu à un véhicule

Un homme du Texas arrêté après avoir prétendument traîné l'ex de sa mère derrière un camion et mis le feu à un véhicule

Robert Eugene Hoffpauir, 37 ans, a été arrêté et accusé du meurtre de Roman Rodriguez, 60 ans, selon le bureau du shérif du comté de Liberty

Leona Lewis dit qu'elle a été "profondément blessée" par Michael Costello après avoir accusé Chrissy Teigen d'intimidation

Leona Lewis dit qu'elle a été "profondément blessée" par Michael Costello après avoir accusé Chrissy Teigen d'intimidation

"Quand les gens s'excusent (Chrissy) et montrent des remords sincères et une réhabilitation pour leurs actions, nous devrions les embrasser et ne pas essayer de les frapper quand ils sont à terre", a écrit Leona Lewis sur Instagram

Kelsey Grammer pleure en se souvenant d'avoir rencontré Paris Jackson quand elle était enfant avec son père Michael Jackson

Kelsey Grammer pleure en se souvenant d'avoir rencontré Paris Jackson quand elle était enfant avec son père Michael Jackson

Kelsey Grammer a rencontré sa co-star de The Space Between Paris Jackson pour la première fois quand elle était plus jeune et a été témoin d'un moment adorable entre elle et son père Michael Jackson

Le réalisateur de Jackass 4, Jeff Tremaine, obtient une ordonnance restrictive de 3 ans contre Bam Margera

Le réalisateur de Jackass 4, Jeff Tremaine, obtient une ordonnance restrictive de 3 ans contre Bam Margera

Jeff Tremaine, 54 ans, a demandé l'ordonnance restrictive contre Bam Margera, 41 ans, après que l'ancienne star de la télévision lui aurait envoyé, ainsi qu'à sa famille, des menaces de mort

Êtes-vous juge?

La science dit que nous le sommes tous, et ce n'est pas nécessairement mauvais.

Êtes-vous juge?

Vous savez quand vous rencontrez quelqu'un et vous ne pouvez pas vous empêcher de prendre des notes mentales. Ou quelqu'un vous surprend en train de lui donner un œil puant quand il fait quelque chose de douteux.

Christophe Colomb ne peut pas distinguer un lamantin d'une sirène

Christophe Colomb ne peut pas distinguer un lamantin d'une sirène

Alors qu'il naviguait dans les eaux autour d'Haïti le 9 janvier 1493, le célèbre explorateur Christophe Colomb a repéré ce qu'il pensait être trois sirènes s'ébattant dans l'eau. Il rapporta plus tard qu'elles « sortaient assez haut de l'eau », mais qu'elles n'étaient « pas aussi jolies qu'elles sont représentées, car d'une certaine manière, elles ressemblent à des hommes.

Une vue du terrain après 50 clients

Beaucoup à faire, mais cela PEUT être fait

Une vue du terrain après 50 clients

Lorsque l'annonce a été faite en 2019 que j'ai décidé de quitter le California Symphony pour avoir un impact plus large au-delà d'une organisation avant de diriger une autre institution de musique classique, les vannes se sont ouvertes de la meilleure façon. Quelques mois plus tard, tout notre travail a changé plus que nous ne l'aurions jamais cru possible, car le coronavirus a brusquement interrompu les activités telles que nous les connaissions, ouvrant de nouvelles questions et de nouveaux défis pour nos organisations et notre domaine.

Quels secrets se cachent derrière la surface des vieilles peintures ?

La technologie moderne et l'ingéniosité à l'ancienne révèlent des découvertes surprenantes

Quels secrets se cachent derrière la surface des vieilles peintures ?

Vincent Van Gogh l'a fait et Pablo Piccaso l'a fait aussi. Les artistes ont peint sur des toiles pour de nombreuses raisons.

Language