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particle physics's posts - English uPOST

Mar 12, 2020. 18 comments

New Analysis of Large Hadron Collider Results Confirms Something Weird Is Happening

New Analysis of Large Hadron Collider Results Confirms Something Weird Is Happening

A theory-defying anomaly has persisted in the latest results from a Large Hadron Collider experiment, according to new results.

The world’s largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, contains a host of experiments that seek to answer the unanswered questions about the nature of the universe. Mostly, these experiments have

ruled out theories describing...

18 Comments

Mar 11, 2020. 8 comments

A Typical Neutron Star Is Only 13.6 Miles Wide, According to New Ultra-Precise Measurement

A Typical Neutron Star Is Only 13.6 Miles Wide, According to New Ultra-Precise Measurement

A typical neutron star measures 22 kilometers (13.6 miles) wide, according to new research. It’s the most accurate measurement yet of these highly compact, super-dense objects.

If black holes are the most extreme phenomena in the universe, then neutron stars have to be a close second (unless quark stars exist, which has yet to be confirmed). Formed in the wake of a supernova explosion (when a...

8 Comments

Mar 11, 2020. 14 comments

A Wild, Six-Quark Particle Might Have Been Dark Matter All Along

A Wild, Six-Quark Particle Might Have Been Dark Matter All Along

Most of the matter in the universe is undetectable in any way except for the gravity it exerts. While some think this mysterious “dark matter” must be made up of unknown particles, others suggest a familiar particle could be the key.

Dark matter has remained elusive, despite many searches to find something that could explain its effects on the universe. But some scientists are increasingly...

14 Comments

Feb 06, 2020. 9 comments

Release the Muons! Physics Breakthrough Will Lead to a New Kind of Particle Collider

Release the Muons! Physics Breakthrough Will Lead to a New Kind of Particle Collider

The next generation of atom smasher could be a

100-kilometer-round ring , costing over $10 billion, with no promise of finding something as glamorous as last decade’s Higgs boson. But does the future of physics need to be so large? What if researchers could probe the secrets of the smallest particles using technology that was, well, smaller?

Scientists have just overcome one of the greatest...

9 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Jan 25, 2020. 14 comments

This Locked Cabinet Holds the Answer to One of the Biggest Questions in Particle Physics

This Locked Cabinet Holds the Answer to One of the Biggest Questions in Particle Physics

A 50-foot ring topped with white insulation sits attached to wires, pipes, and other electrical components in a warehouse on Fermilab’s northern Illinois campus. Scientists taking data with this device have the potential to rock the field of particle physics to its core, but they’re missing a crucial number to make their final calculation: the ticking speed of a clock that’s kept in a back...

14 Comments

Jan 24, 2020. 7 comments

Why I Went Birdwatching at a Particle Physics Lab

Why I Went Birdwatching at a Particle Physics Lab

We drove past the perfect-circle frozen pond delineating the Booster—the second in a sequence of Fermilab’s particle accelerators—and then onto the 2-mile ring road that traces the tunnel that houses the Main Injector accelerator. Along the road are unfrozen ponds filled with water used for cooling research equipment, where Canada geese have taken up residence by the hundreds. We stopped to...

7 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Jan 14, 2020. 5 comments

Has Hubble Detected Rogue Clumps of Dark Matter?

Has Hubble Detected Rogue Clumps of Dark Matter?

Scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope have discovered evidence of small clumps of dark matter warping the light from distant quasars.

Regular matter seems to form only a small part of the universe—much more of the matter seems to be “dark” stuff that influences regular matter via gravity but can’t be detected directly. The most widely accepted theory to explain dark matter suggests that...

5 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Jan 11, 2020. 5 comments

A Major New Particle Collider Is Coming to New York

A Major New Particle Collider Is Coming to New York

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided on the final location of a major upcoming American particle collider: Brookhaven National Lab on Long Island in New York.

The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed particle accelerator that will slam electrons into the nuclei of heavy atoms, with the goal of better understanding nuclear structure and the force that holds atoms together. Two...

5 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Dec 11, 2019. 8 comments

ISS Sees Thunderstorm Beaming Electromagnetic Pulse Into Space, Producing Gamma Rays and 'Elves'

ISS Sees Thunderstorm Beaming Electromagnetic Pulse Into Space, Producing Gamma Rays and 'Elves'

At 8:01 p.m. on October 10, 2018, a bolt of lightning flashed inside of a storm cloud just east of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. The International Space Station was passing overhead at the time, and a suite of instruments observed as the bolt produced a flash of gamma radiation—and, simultaneously, emitted a glowing ring of ultraviolet and visible light in the topmost layer of the...

8 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Nov 26, 2019. 5 comments

CERN's Oldest Particle Accelerator Is Still Running 60 Years Later

CERN's Oldest Particle Accelerator Is Still Running 60 Years Later

The oldest particle accelerator at CERN, home to the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, is celebrating its 60th birthday. It’s still running.

The Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerated its first protons on November 24, 1959. It was the world’s highest-energy accelerator when it first began running. Though it’s since lost the title, today it supplies protons or heavy ions to a number of...

5 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Nov 26, 2019. 8 comments

Let's Pump the Brakes on the So-Called 'No-Brainer Nobel Prize'

Let's Pump the Brakes on the So-Called 'No-Brainer Nobel Prize'

Researchers in Hungary have published the exciting new claim that they’ve discovered a new subatomic particle, but it’s nowhere near time to start talking about Nobel Prizes, as CNN (and now everyone who syndicates them) has done.

Since 2015, the team at the Institute of Nuclear Research (Atomki) and the University of Debrecen claims to have spotted a mysterious correlation between pairs of...

8 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Nov 14, 2019. 16 comments

Could Antimatter Be the Portal Into the Dark Universe?

Could Antimatter Be the Portal Into the Dark Universe?

A new paper asks: What if antimatter is the portal into the dark universe?

Measurements of the universe reveal that most of its mass appears to be “dark matter,” invisible stuff that interacts with regular matter via the laws of gravity but hasn’t been directly detected,

despite major efforts to find it . Scientists are hunting dark matter from various fronts. One team is looking for a popular...

16 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Nov 07, 2019. 12 comments

10-Year Proton Measurement Mystery Is Probably Solved

10-Year Proton Measurement Mystery Is Probably Solved

A precise new measurement of the size of the proton shows a decade-long problem may now have a solution.

The proton is arguably the most important particle to our everyday lives, forming one of the three core components of atoms and determining elements’ identities. That makes the values of its various properties extra important. Experimental disagreement over one of those properties, called...

12 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Oct 23, 2019. 5 comments

The Future of Particle Physics Is Bright, Bleak, and Magical

The Future of Particle Physics Is Bright, Bleak, and Magical
Decade's EndDecade's EndGizmodo, io9, and Earther look back at our passing decade and look ahead at what kind of future awaits us in the next ten years.

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider triumphantly announced the discovery of the Higgs boson back in the summer of 2012. Nicknamed “the God particle,” it was the last new undiscovered particle predicted by the backbone theory of particle...

5 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Sep 18, 2019. 17 comments

A Huge Experiment Has 'Weighed' the Tiny Neutrino, a Particle That Passes Right Through Matter

A Huge Experiment Has 'Weighed' the Tiny Neutrino, a Particle That Passes Right Through Matter

An experiment nearly two decades in the making has finally unveiled its measurements of the mass of the universe’s most abundant matter particle: the neutrino.

The neutrino could be the weirdest subatomic particle; though abundant, it requires some of the most sensitive detectors to observe. Scientists have been working for decades to figure out whether neutrinos have mass and if so, what...

17 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Sep 14, 2019. 8 comments

Scientists Debut Powerful Magnet for Future Particle Collider

Scientists Debut Powerful Magnet for Future Particle Collider

Physicists at Fermilab have produced and tested a powerful magnet of the sort that could appear in the next generation of particle colliders.

Today’s largest particle accelerator is the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, a ring of magnets 26.7 kilometers (16.6 miles) around. But plans exist for a Future Circular Collider, a 100-kilometer (62-mile) behemoth with 10 times the energy...

8 Comments

George Dvorsky George Dvorsky Jul 30, 2019. 10 comments

Unexplained Radiation Leak Traced to Russian Nuclear Facility

Unexplained Radiation Leak Traced to Russian Nuclear Facility

Two years after a mysterious cloud of radiation swept through Europe, a team of scientists has pinpointed the source of the leak to a nuclear reprocessing plant in Russia, which was preparing materials for an Italian physics experiment at the time.

In early October 2017, a cloud of radioactive material swept through Europe. Monitoring stations from across the continent reported an apparently...

10 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Jun 07, 2019. 3 comments

Large Hadron Collider Experiment Reveals Alien Structure of a 'Pentaquark'

Large Hadron Collider Experiment Reveals Alien Structure of a 'Pentaquark'

New results from the world’s largest particle accelerator illuminate the structure of the pentaquark, an exotic particle consisting of five quarks bound together.

Quarks, the subatomic particles that make up protons and neutrons, usually bind together in pairs or triplets to form classes of particles called mesons and baryons, respectively. But recent analyses of data taken at the Large Hadron...

3 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum May 15, 2019. 10 comments

What Does a Particle Collider Sound Like?

What Does a Particle Collider Sound Like?
SoundmodoIn this Gizmodo series, we find out what things sound, sounded, and would sound like.  

Scientists explore the limits of physics by pumping energy into components of atoms, such as electrons and protons, accelerating them to nearly the speed of light, and slamming the beams of particles together in hopes of discovering something new. You can imagine that this process gets quite...

10 Comments

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum May 10, 2019. 2 comments

Scientists Recreate Hallmark Quantum Physics Experiment Using Antimatter

Scientists Recreate Hallmark Quantum Physics Experiment Using Antimatter

Scientists recreated one of the most important experiments in the history of physics—but this time, they used antimatter instead of regular matter.

All matter particles have a corresponding antimatter particle, which shares most of the same properties but is a mirror image of the particle and has the opposite charge. Decades ago, scientists determined that when regular-matter particles pass...

2 Comments

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