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Engineering's posts - English uPOST

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 15, 2019 at 12:01.

Real-Time 3D Imaging Shows How Disposable Lithium Batteries Degrade

Real-Time 3D Imaging Shows How Disposable Lithium Batteries Degrade

We all know that lithium-ion batteries can fail catastrophically . But other batteries can also burst into flame unprovoked, and a team of researchers is using real-time 3D imaging to understand exactly how.

A team of engineers form University College London has been using X-ray imaging techniques to captures 3D views of what happens inside disposable lithium batteries. You might wonder why...

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Ryan F. Mandelbaum Jul 14, 2019.

Scientists in Florida Make the World's Strongest Magnet

Scientists in Florida Make the World's Strongest Magnet

Scientists have broken the record for the strongest continuous magnetic field, according to a new research paper.

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, or MagLab, at Florida State University runs the world’s strongest continuous magnet for use by scientists, at 45 tesla—around 10 times stronger than a hospital MRI machine. Now, researchers at the lab have announced creating a...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 13, 2019.

This $300 Palm-Sized Bug Wirelessly Steals  Laptop Crypto Keys

This $300 Palm-Sized Bug Wirelessly Steals  Laptop Crypto Keys

This self-contained snooping device can steal data from laptops within 19 inches of it, sniffing out information based on the radio waves that leak from processors as a result of their variations in power use. And, as its designers point out, it’s small enough to fit inside a pita.

Developed by researchers from Tel Aviv University and Israel’s Technion research institute, the device is built...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 12, 2019.

This Is the World’s Highest Peak-Power Laser Diode Array

This Is the World’s Highest Peak-Power Laser Diode Array

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have created the world's highest peak-power laser diode array, capable of creating up to 3.2 megawatts. The new device will be used in Europe's new Extreme Light facility, which will be as bad-ass as it sounds.

The diode array will sit within the High-Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System at the European Union's Extreme Light...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 11, 2019.

The Solar Cells of the Future Look Very Pretty Up Close

The Solar Cells of the Future Look Very Pretty Up Close

You’re looking at a perovskite. Not an Eastern European bird of prey, nor an exotic toy to play with in the wind, but a potential future of solar power.

The materials, first discovered in 1839 but only recently used in solar applications, are defiined not by the elements they contain but their crystalline structure. And that’s what you can see here: neat chunks of defect-free crystals...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 11, 2019.

This Full-Color Display is Just Microns Thick and Flexible Like Skin

This Full-Color Display is Just Microns Thick and Flexible Like Skin

The prospect of a material that can change color yet is still flexible enough to wear as clothing is a perennial sci-fi dream—and now amazingly close to reality. This new electronic skin is just a few microns thick and yet manages to change color, acting as a credible digital display.

The new material, pictured above, has been created by a team from the University of Central Florida led by...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 11, 2019.

This Rubber Film Generates Power as It Stretches

This Rubber Film Generates Power as It Stretches

It might look like some kind of food wrap, but this roll of red rubber is rather more special than that: it’s a new flexible material that creates electricity as it deforms.

Materials that create electricity when they’re subjected to pressure are nothing new. Known as piezoelectrics, they’re typically made either of solid ceramics that produce respectable quantities of electric charge or...

George Dvorsky George Dvorsky Jul 10, 2019.

Freaky Robotic Skin Brings Inanimate Objects to Life

Freaky Robotic Skin Brings Inanimate Objects to Life

Typically, robots are built to perform a single task. To make them more adaptable, researchers from Yale University have developed a kind of “robotic skin” that transforms ordinary objects into multifunctional robots.

It’s called OmniSkins, and it’s the brainchild of assistant professor Rebecca Kramer-Bottiglio and her colleagues at Yale University. The neat thing about OmniSkins is its extreme...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 10, 2019.

New Scanner Uniquely Identifies Gadgets Just From the Noise They Emit

New Scanner Uniquely Identifies Gadgets Just From the Noise They Emit

Without using them, one iPhone or laptop is indistinguishable from another of the same model—to the human eye, at least. A team of researchers, though, has developed a tool that can tell gadgets apart based just on the electromagnetic noise they create.

Developed by Disney Research, the new technique—called EM-ID—analyzes the electromagnetic signals emitted by electronic devices and attempts...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 10, 2019.

The Surface Texture of This Material Is Tuned With a Simple Squeeze

The Surface Texture of This Material Is Tuned With a Simple Squeeze

This lump of polymer may look nice and smooth right now, but given a shove it can form complex pasterns of ridges or bumps on its surface—the result of 3D printing the harder, black material within a softer matrix.

The material’s been created by a team from MIT using a 3D printing process to accurately place rigid polymer particles within much more flexible surroundings. When compressed, the...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 10, 2019.

This Air Force Workshop Is Like an Engineering Operating Theater

This Air Force Workshop Is Like an Engineering Operating Theater

At home, you might be content with a wrench and an oily rag to fix up your car. But that doesn’t cut it for Air Force mechanics.

Here, members of the 23rd Component Maintenance Squadron Propulsion Flight perform maintenance on a TF-34 engine in spotless surroundings. The engine will find its way into a Moody AFB’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs.

[US Air Force]

Jul 10, 2019.

How Technology Can Help Cities Make Better Use of Storm Water

How Technology Can Help Cities Make Better Use of Storm Water

More than half the world’s population lives in metropolitan centers. The built environment of a city is very different from that of rural and natural areas. When it rains over a rural landscape, much of the rainwater sinks into the ground or is evaporated or transpirated by trees, crops and other plants.

Transpiration is the biological process in which plants pull moisture out of the soil by...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 10, 2019.

"Yolk and Shell" Nanoparticles Could Make  Batteries Last Longer

"Yolk and Shell" Nanoparticles Could Make  Batteries Last Longer

As batteries go through repeated charge-and-discharge cycles, their electrodes expand and contract—and the physical damage that causes leads to gradual battery degradation. Now, a team of researchers from MIT has a new kind of nanoparticle that may ease the problem.

The new advance is a nanoparticle, with a solid shell and a kind of “yolk” inside, that can be used as the electrode. It’s the...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 08, 2019.

New Memory Alloy Springs Back Into Shape Even After 10 Million Bends

New Memory Alloy Springs Back Into Shape Even After 10 Million Bends

Memory alloys that spring back into a pre-defined shape are nothing new, but regular bending means they fatigue and fail within a relatively short time-scale. Now, a team of engineers has developed an alloy that rebounds into shape even after 10 million bends.

Existing memory alloys have found plenty of uses, in everything from flexible glasses frames to medical implants that open up blood...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 07, 2019.

This Supercapacitor Is Paper-Thin, Stores Energy as Well as a Battery

This Supercapacitor Is Paper-Thin, Stores Energy as Well as a Battery

A team of researchers from UCLA Berkeley has developed a new supercapacitor which is paper-thin, super-fast to charge and can match batteries with its energy storage density.

In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers explain how they've developed the supercapacitor. Using laser-scribed graphene in combination with manganese-dioxide, the team ...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 07, 2019.

Rebuilding Cambridge University's First Computer

Rebuilding Cambridge University's First Computer

In 1946, scientists at Cambridge University built the institution’s first ever computer—the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator. One of the first to be used to solve real scientific problems, it was scrapped to make way for its successor. Now, it’s being rebuilt.

During its lifetime it gained the ability to perform some pretty complex operations—-dealing with complex numbers,...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 05, 2019.

New Material Can Fold From Full 3D to Flat All By Itself

New Material Can Fold From Full 3D to Flat All By Itself
Your browser does not support HTML5 video tag.Click here to view original GIFImages by Johannes Overvelde/SEAS

Imagine being able to unfurl a huge tent that immediately pitched itself from a small bag. That’s what this material could provide, according to a a team of researchers from Harvard.

The structure is actually built up from a series of extruded cubes, like the one below. With edges...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 05, 2019.

This Slab of Gunk Could Be Used to Grow You a New Nose

This Slab of Gunk Could Be Used to Grow You a New Nose

It doesn’t look much, this slab of intersecting gelatinous green-orange cylinders. But in fact it’s a new stretchable hydrogel, that could be used to create 3D printed medical implants—such as replacement cartilage for noses or ears.

The material has been created in a collaboration between researchers at MIT, Duke University, and Columbia University. The material is made from two key polymers...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 05, 2019.

You'll Never Guess What This Bizarre-Looking Device Is 

You'll Never Guess What This Bizarre-Looking Device Is 

This device will not shine your shoes. Nor will it fix up your hair. In fact it’s a prototype asteroid cleaner, that’s been specially designed to help collect dust and debris in the far-flung reaches of our solar system.

Developed by Added Value Solutions for the European Space Agency, the device overcomes a problem that we don’t have to think about too much here on Earth: Low gravity. If you...

Jamie Condliffe Jamie Condliffe Jul 03, 2019.

Simple Collections of Gold Nanoparticles Can Develop Computational Abilities

Simple Collections of Gold Nanoparticles Can Develop Computational Abilities

We’re used to thinking of silicon as being the go-to material in computer architecture. But now a team of scientists has shown that a random assembly of cold nanoparticles can evolve to perform computational tasks too.

A team of researchers from the University of Twente in the Netherlands has been experimenting with tiny gold particles to investigate if they can be encouraged to perform...

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