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Movie Review's posts - English uPOST

May 01, 2020. 5 comments

The director of Rubber returns with a deranged love story between a man and his jacket

The director of Rubber returns with a deranged love story between a man and his jacket

Getting older drives men to weird places. Some cope with ink or dye. Others splurge on sports cars. And of course, there’s the timeless ritual of chasing someone half your age, as though the attention of youth might somehow restore it. For Georges, the unmoored fortysomething divorcé Jean Dujardin plays in the demented French comedy Deerskin, midlife crisis takes the form of a fashion...

5 Comments

May 01, 2020.

Moonlight’s Ashton Sanders broods through the familiar Netflix drama All Day And A Night

Moonlight’s Ashton Sanders broods through the familiar Netflix drama All Day And A Night

It’s true that there’s nothing new under the sun, and that everybody’s paying tribute to somebody. But Netflix’s latest original movie, All Day And A Night, is uniquely disadvantaged in this department, as it’s the latest in a series of films about the young, Black male experience in Oakland, California to come out this decade. (Specifically,

Blindspotting and Ryan Coogler’s Fruitvale...
Apr 30, 2020.

For a 2-hour orgy of S&M and severed limbs, Liberté is pretty tedious

For a 2-hour orgy of S&M and severed limbs, Liberté is pretty tedious

In the year 1774, some time before the French Revolution, a group of aristocratic libertines exiled from the court of Louis XVI gather in a secluded patch of forest for an extended night of no-holds-barred sexual debauchery. So begins Liberté, a film that, over the course of its languorous runtime, makes room for scenes of rimming, piss-play, and a bit of S&M action involving a fire poker and...

Apr 29, 2020. 6 comments

Netflix takes another shot at Cyrano de Bergerac with queer love triangle The Half Of It

Netflix takes another shot at Cyrano de Bergerac with queer love triangle The Half Of It

“This is not a love story,” introverted high schooler Ellie Chu (Leah Lewis) warns us in her opening narration. “Or not one where anyone gets what they want.” That ominous caveat adds a little more tension than there might otherwise be to a Netflix coming-of-age rom-com that updates the Cyrano de Bergerac formula for gen Z. In place of Cyrano’s nasal insecurity, Ellie’s anxiety stems from...

6 Comments

Apr 25, 2020. 5 comments

Beastie Boys Story is no sure shot

Beastie Boys Story is no sure shot

What if they made a Beastie Boys movie and it wasn’t any fun? If there were none of the rambunctious spirit that defined the New York trio’s music even after they abandoned the party-boy put-ons of License To Ill? If the surviving band members’ recollections of their journey from hardcore goof-offs to festival-headlining elder statesmen of hip-hop were hemmed in by a TelePrompter and an...

5 Comments

Apr 23, 2020. 10 comments

True History Of The Kelly Gang writes a powerful fictionalized biography of the outlaw

True History Of The Kelly Gang writes a powerful fictionalized biography of the outlaw

It’s not much of an exaggeration to say that as long as there have been movies, there have been movies about Ned Kelly. The 19th-century bushranger, born just a few years after Jesse James and Wyatt Earp on a different frontier across the ocean, was the subject of what’s widely considered to be the very first feature-length film: 1906’s The Story Of The Kelly Gang, an hour-long glorification...

10 Comments

Apr 22, 2020. 14 comments

Chris Hemsworth reunites with some Marvel talent for the grisly but generic Extraction

Chris Hemsworth reunites with some Marvel talent for the grisly but generic Extraction

Chris Hemsworth’s talent lies mostly in comedy, but his looks and physique have all but ensured a career of glowering he-man roles. Nonetheless, the Marvel veterans behind Extraction really should have known better. The film, which is exactly as generic as its title, casts Hemsworth as Tyler Rake, a name that follows the same classic Schwarzenegger formula that gave us Harry Tasker and John...

14 Comments

Apr 22, 2020. 2 comments

Ghost Town Anthology creeps up on you with its haunting premise

Ghost Town Anthology creeps up on you with its haunting premise

Québecois filmmaker Denis Côté (

Vic + Flo Saw A Bear ) takes his time establishing the arresting premise of his latest feature, Ghost Town Anthology, even though the gist is right there in the English-language title. (In French, it’s called Répertoire Des Villes Disparues, which means basically the same thing but employs a different, less literal metaphor.) Set in the tiny burg of...

2 Comments

Apr 22, 2020. 10 comments

Braveheart gets another sort-of sequel with the meager Robert The Bruce

Braveheart gets another sort-of sequel with the meager Robert The Bruce

The first time 14th-century Scottish

outlaw/king Robert The Bruce is seen in the new film that bears his name, he’s the subject of a bedtime story. The movie opens with widowed Scottish peasant Morag (Anna Hutchison) spinning a yarn for the benefit of her family, a near-mythic tale of Robert The Bruce vanquishing an enemy. (Baron John Comyn, played by Jared Harris in a thankless cameo,...

10 Comments

Apr 21, 2020. 6 comments

Why Don’t You Just Die! is a euphoric dose of pitch-black Russian violence

Why Don’t You Just Die! is a euphoric dose of pitch-black Russian violence

Slippery as blood-soaked porcelain, Kirill Sokolov’s Why Don’t You Just Die! is the thriller played as pitch-black farce, a Russian update on a noir formula that’s had both its slapstick and violence knobs turned up to the max. At its best when breathlessly racing from one set piece to the next, Sokolov’s comedy really only has a single central joke to its name—gouts of blood firing in...

6 Comments

Apr 16, 2020. 8 comments

Endings, Beginnings is an endless slog

Endings, Beginnings is an endless slog

Drake Doremus specializes in the indie drama equivalent of bougie engagement and wedding photos, complete with out-of-focus string lights, wet beaches, and handsomely groomed people who’ve been told to just act natural for the camera. But even by these low standards, his new film, Endings, Beginnings, is a complete dud. The plot is simple: Daphne (Shailene Woodley), a thirtyish, unemployed...

8 Comments

Apr 15, 2020. 3 comments

Fugitive thriller The Quarry stumbles during its slow trek into no country for old men

Fugitive thriller The Quarry stumbles during its slow trek into no country for old men

Visions of a burning house haunt a nameless fugitive in Scott Teems’ The Quarry. Played by

Shea Whigham and referred to only as The Man, the outlaw heads south trailed by police helicopters and a guilty conscience. Desperation begets more desperation, setting the stage for a border-town tale of imposture, sin, and redemption. Yet this muddled slow-burn tragedy—adapted from the Damon Galgut...

3 Comments

Apr 11, 2020. 16 comments

Trolls World Tour is a shameless DreamWorks dance party you can attend from your couch

Trolls World Tour is a shameless DreamWorks dance party you can attend from your couch

If a comprehensive history of DreamWorks Animation is ever written, the 2016 semi-musical

Trolls may figure into it as a pivotal text, despite its ignominious toy-shelf origins and not exactly record-breaking box office (and now a sequel that has been forced to bypass most theaters entirely due to a pandemic). The studio has cranked out dozens of feature films, but the Trolls series works...

16 Comments

Apr 10, 2020. 7 comments

Netflix’s Love Wedding Repeat adds some cringe to the rom-com

Netflix’s Love Wedding Repeat adds some cringe to the rom-com

The term

“Netflix rom-com” has come to represent a certain brand of comfort food. For better or for worse, Love Wedding Repeat is here to break the mold. The Sam Claflin/Olivia Munn vehicle—which Netflix picked up at Cannes last year—isn’t so much a romance as a full-on cringe comedy. And while that will no doubt be jarring for those seeking easy familiarity from the latest wedding-themed...

7 Comments

Apr 09, 2020. 6 comments

Sea Fever is the accidental zeitgeist horror movie of our isolated here and now

Sea Fever is the accidental zeitgeist horror movie of our isolated here and now

Every movie is now a horror movie. To watch even, say, an innocuous romantic comedy is to feel shudders of instinctive unease, triggered by scenes of people hugging or attending a concert or not spending the entire running time washing their hands. Of course, some films might actually benefit, so to speak, from the anxiety we’re bringing to them. Take, for example, Sea Fever. Set aboard an...

6 Comments

Mar 26, 2020. 7 comments

Netflix’s Crip Camp is a different kind of summer camp movie

Netflix’s Crip Camp is a different kind of summer camp movie

“The world wants us dead.” That statement is delivered, if not quite casually, then with startling clarity by one of the disability rights advocates interviewed in Crip Camp. Some might be shocked by the candor. But as this Netflix-released documentary makes clear, people with disabilities don’t have the luxury of being surprised by society’s indifference toward them. Able-bodied people may...

7 Comments

Mar 25, 2020. 18 comments

Two new movies fail to exploit Jesse Eisenberg’s brainy talent and star power

Two new movies fail to exploit Jesse Eisenberg’s brainy talent and star power

Jesse Eisenberg doesn’t exactly fit the profile of the classic Hollywood leading man. Yet in his own lanky, squirmy way, the actor is a lot like an old-school movie star: He doesn’t so much disappear into each new role as offer precise variations on a type, creating a kind of spectrum of millennial eggheads—from nebbishes to geek tyrants, fumbling romantics to a slicker breed of brainy....

18 Comments

Mar 25, 2020. 14 comments

Teen movie Banana Split is as artificial as fake fruit

Teen movie Banana Split is as artificial as fake fruit

Benjamin Kasulke’s directorial debut Banana Split is not so much a movie about teenagers as it is a “teen movie”—the kind where people who look old enough to be currently filing for unemployment trade bon mots while wearing Converse high-tops that look like they have never seen the outdoors. It’s the summer after graduation, and college-bound April (Hannah Marks, who also co-wrote the script)...

14 Comments

Mar 13, 2020. 3 comments

The powerful Never Rarely Sometimes Always puts a human face on the right to choose

The powerful Never Rarely Sometimes Always puts a human face on the right to choose

Every woman has an abortion story—if not her own, then that of someone she knows. If you’re lucky, it’s relatively mundane, a story about a minor medical procedure obtained safely and affordably. But the fact of the matter is, whether due to geography, economics, age, or cultural barriers, freedom of choice is not the same for everyone in America. In many places, there’s not much difference...

3 Comments

Mar 12, 2020. 19 comments

Archie from Riverdale finds love, faith, and a guitar in the blandly inspirational I Still Believe

Archie from Riverdale finds love, faith, and a guitar in the blandly inspirational I Still Believe

Early in I Still Believe, a young man is given a guitar by his family. He is moved and delighted by the gift, and climbs aboard a Greyhound bus, carrying only the instrument and a threadbare duffel bag. The bus leaves Lafayette, Indiana, and heads for a small bible college in sunny California, and as it passes through the plains, we see the young man through the window, smiling beatifically,...

19 Comments

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