LOADING ...

Modern Technology Began in Garages, and So May The Future of Batteries

Darren Orf Mar 16, 2015. 9 comments

Welcome to another Sunday and another round up of wonderful science and tech reads from around the web. We've got tons of great stuff, all worthy of carving a few minutes out of your busy (or lax) Sunday. This week we're talking about Google's dichotomy as an information index and glorified advertiser, the very real politics of a very virtual society, trying to answer the "why" behind spying, and how the future of batteries may come from a garage. Happy reading!


  • On Monday, many watched, or the very least reacted, to Apple's latest addition to its hardware lineup—the Apple Watch. But what was even more enlightening was how Google began indexing the search term "watch" to immediately draw up the purchase page for Apple's latest wearable. This all raises the question—is Google an index of humanity's collective knowledge or just a glorified advertising site? [Motherboard]
  • EVE Online is one of the most fascinating games ever created, where massive digital battles can be totaled up in real world currency and where physical monuments are erected in remembrance of virtual destruction. The Atlantic takes a deep dive in to the world of EVE Online, and how the politics of such a community are very much real. [The Atlantic]
  • "What's holding back solar and wind isn't their availability but the fact that the technology to generate renewable energy has leapt far ahead of the capacity to store and deploy it round the clock as needed." This is a real problem facing the future of energy storage, but one enterprising tinkerer is working on converting a busted Tesla battery into the future of home energy. [Bloomberg]
  • What is the "why" of spying? If the intention is to catch terrorists—but there's no reported evidence of that really doing anything—then why do countries find the need to continually spy on their citizens? The reason is its cheaper than trying to use technology in more meaningful ways. It's another chapter in the rich-versus-poor epic of human history. [The Guardian]

9 Comments

Other Darren Orf's posts

FCC Will Go Ahead With Its Plan To Make Cable Boxes Suck Less FCC Will Go Ahead With Its Plan To Make Cable Boxes Suck Less

Today, the FCC decided in a 3-2 vote to keep going down the road that will (hopefully) make all our cable boxes suck less. Not only will this plan probably save you some serious cash , it will also bring a much-needed injection of competition from third parties, meaning your cable box may actually not suck in the future....

Even Obama Uses a Selfie Stick Even Obama Uses a Selfie Stick

Your browser does not support HTML5 video tag.Click here to view original GIF BitStream is the stream of consciousness of the tech internet, gathering up all the pieces of news and rumors that may have slipped by in the last 24 hours.Obama uses a selfie stick, and that's a good thing President Obama is an internet president. He needs to...

SpaceX Is Busy SpaceX Is Busy

Earlier this month, SpaceX said they were ready to move into mass production with its Falcon 9 rocket . Yeah, no kidding.This photo, posted on SpaceX’s Instagram, shows five first stage rockets in the works at the company’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California. Previous reports have said NASA is hungry for reusable rockets, and SpaceX says that in the near...

A Security Flaw Leaves Millions of Verizon Customers Vulnerable A Security Flaw Leaves Millions of Verizon Customers Vulnerable

Technology is filled with all kinds of rumors, real and fabricated. It gives us a look at what might be and will be. BitStream gathers the whispers all in one place to divine what the future has in store.Verizon may be snatching up media companies left and right , but it might want to spend some funds on upping...

Suggested posts

One Journalist's Undercover Stint as a Terrorist's Online Girlfriend One Journalist's Undercover Stint as a Terrorist's Online Girlfriend

Welcome to Reading List, a weekly collection of great tech reads from around the web. This week we explore one journalist’s undercover internet relationship with a Syrian jihadi, the vicious legal battle that’s stymied the growth of hologram technology in the entertainment industry, and more! Enjoy.When a French journalist posed online as a young woman interested in Isis, she...

Why California's High-Speed Rail Matters Why California's High-Speed Rail Matters

Welcome to Reading List, a breakdown of some wonderfully constructed words, phrases, and sentences you should really be reading this week. Before you get too excited, take a second to take a peek over all our exhaustive (seriously I'm still recovering) coverage of CES 2015. But when you get a gadget overload, take a look at some of these...

Maybe a Crowd-Sourced Ambassador to Outer Space Isn't the Best Idea  Maybe a Crowd-Sourced Ambassador to Outer Space Isn't the Best Idea 

Welcome once again to Reading List, awesome technology and science reads tucked away in one place. Does SimCity deliver a more painful realization of our society that we'd care to admit? Is crowd-sourcing humanity's first impression to the rest of the universe really a great idea? What will happens once machines can read our emotions? All interesting questions, let's...

How Rage Quitting and Humble Bragging Have Become Real Things How Rage Quitting and Humble Bragging Have Become Real Things

Welcome to Reading List, a weekly collection of great tech reads from around the web. This week explores how the internet has spawned a new class of phrasal constructions a la “rage quitting,” whether Bitcoin could work in prison, how department stores have shaped our culture, and more. Enjoy!From Victorian London to modern day mega-malls, department stores have changed...

What It's Like To Lie In Bed For 70 Days (For Science) What It's Like To Lie In Bed For 70 Days (For Science)

Welcome to Reading List, your one-stop shop for the great tech reads around the web. All these well-crafted long reads touch on password security, the dark web, internet television, NASA experiments, and humanity's continued (and fruitful) research with psychedelics. Need I say more?Just in case I do need to say more, here's a brief look into these stories and...

The CD Factory Worker Who Broke the Music Industry  The CD Factory Worker Who Broke the Music Industry 

Welcome to Reading List, a weekly collection of great tech reads from around the web. This week explores the early days of online music piracy, the implications of America’s military drone base in Germany, the potential pitfalls of artificial intelligence, and more! Enjoy.The story of Benny Glover, the small-town North Carolinian whose day-job involved packaging Jay-Z and Dr. Dre...

The Hidden Biases Our Internet Memes Help Propagate The Hidden Biases Our Internet Memes Help Propagate

Welcome to Reading List, a weekly collection of great tech reads from around the web. This week explores the hidden biases of Internet memes, the science of artificial testicles, whether the Apple Watch’s success depends on its ability to turn us all into big jerks, and more! Enjoy.A team of researchers has conduced the most comprehensive study of Internet...

Samsung's Got a Steve Jobs Problem Samsung's Got a Steve Jobs Problem

Welcome to Reading List, your weekly collection of great tech reads from around the web. This week we learn the problem behind Samsung's design, why America's infrastructure is rotting, and on a less grim note, get a rare peek at the technology behind Magic Leap's mixed reality. Enjoy!If you've ever wondered why Samsung's design is so disappointing, Fast Co's...

Doctors Say Morcellation Can Leave Women Vulnerable to Cancer Doctors Say Morcellation Can Leave Women Vulnerable to Cancer

Welcome to this week’s Reading List, your Sunday guide to some of the most interesting science and technology stories on the internet this week. This week, we’ll examine a potentially deadly medical procedure, ponder the inner workings of social networks, and more.Morcellation is a less invasive way to remove fibroids and other growths through laparoscopic surgergy - but if...

This is How A Volcano Created Frankenstein's Monster This is How A Volcano Created Frankenstein's Monster

Welcome to Reading List, Gizmodo’s weekly collection of the most interesting science and technology stories from around the internet. This week, we’ll look at the aftermath of a 200 year old volcanic eruption, visit Cuba’s burgeoning Wi-Fi hotspots, sample the Martian cuisine of the future, and take a road trip to the kudzu-lined highways of the South.When Indonesia’s Mount...

Language